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The next day we went to Huangluo Yao village where the women have very long hair and saw their display.

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They have hair which reaches the ground or can be even longer and thick, very black and shiny – though the latter is probably because of how they care for it.  They wear their hair tied up in a complicated bun, almost like a turban. It is tied in a pony tail in the middle at the front and then twisted and wound round the head, the second time threading it through the loop of the first time and then finally secured in a knot at the front and the comb used to smooth it through that process is then pushed in to hold the knot in place; all very neat.

According to local tradition, women cut their hair only once in their lives ― at about 16 to 18 years old when they are considered ready for adulthood and marriage. The cut hair is kept like a hairpiece, and twisted into part of their regular hairdo. They hold a Guinness Record for the length of their hair!

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This post is an extract of my mother’s travel journal written during a tour of China in 2013.

For daily pictures you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com, like the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg  and follow me on Twitter @tash_higman.

Hairy village The next day we went to Huangluo Yao village where the women have very long hair and saw their display.
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Yulong River boating (punting?)

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Inside the Water Caves in Guilin, China

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Going over weirs in bamboo boats on the Yulong River, China

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In the Water Caves in Guilin, China

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Retrieving the fish from the cormorant on Yulong River, China

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Water caves in Guilin, China

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confronting or comforting?Along th River Li, China

confronting or comforting?
Along th River Li, China

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We then drove back through Yung Dao and on to Water Caves near Yiling Village, Yangshuo. There we were taken through by a guide who spoke English, the driver came along too as he had not been there before.  In the caves there is warm mud and it is possible to have a ‘mud bath’ and then on to a hot spring.

Also there are stalagmites and stalactites in all sorts of various forms and shapes. The cave is all lit up with coloured lights and rather kitschy, we were surprised that in spite of the warm damp atmosphere no algae have begun to grow.

This post is an extract of my mother’s travel journal written during a tour of China in 2013.

For daily pictures you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com, like the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg  and follow me on Twitter @tash_higman.

Water Caves We then drove back through Yung Dao and on to Water Caves near Yiling Village, Yangshuo. There we were taken through by a guide who spoke English, the driver came along too as he had not been there before.  
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Cormorant fisherman on the Yulong River, China

(Source: wp.me)