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From the plaques placed in the High Line Park:

“The High Line was built by the New York Central Railroad between 1929 and 1934 to lift dangerous freight trains from Manhattan’s streets.  The Highline’s trains carried meat, produce and dairy products into warehouses and factories at the third-floor [ed: British English: 2nd floor] level.  It was known as the ‘Life Line of New York’.

As trucking began to replace rail as the primary means of moving freight in New York Cty, train traffic declined on the High Line, and the southernmost section as torn down.  By 1980, the trains had stopped running.

In 1999, with the High Line threatened with demolition, neighbourhood residents formed Friends of the Highlight to advocate for the preservation and reuse of the structure.  In 2002, the City of New York boldly committed to transport the High Line into a one-of-a-kind park.”

Interestingly it is less ‘one-of-a-kind’ as more cities are considering turning dis-used rail infrastructure into public recreation space.

I took a lot of pictures, these are the park itself:

These are views of New York from the park:

There is lots of art work along the park, this piece by Marianne Vitale made from ‘frogs’ used in railroad points is the most appropriate one to add to this blog.

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Highlights of the High Line From the plaques placed in the High Line Park: “The High Line was built by the New York Central Railroad between 1929 and 1934 to lift dangerous freight trains from Manhattan’s streets. 
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My accommodation in New York City was the International Chelsea Hostel, right in the middle of Chelsea.  I took a walk around and love all the cast iron railings at on the steps to the houses.  There isn’t much cast iron fencing in England, much of it having been requisitioned for remoulding into objects of war during the 1940’s.

I also encountered a bursting fire hydrant on my wanderings.  I suspect as much as we were smiling and taking pictures, none of us human were enjoying the impromptu fountain as much as the dog playing in it!

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

Made in Chelsea My accommodation in New York City was the International Chelsea Hostel, right in the middle of Chelsea. 
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My journey into and out of New York City were both from NYP, New York Pennsylvania Station.  I could not travel through New York City by train and not visit GCT.  Amtrak no longer serves Grand Central Terminal so I found other means of transport there changing subways here.

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I estimate a third of people in the passenger hall were tourists like me, visiting to say they had been to one of more romantic real-life movie sets.  It is a lot smaller than I expected it to be from its film depictions – the camera makes things look bigger.  That said, I never realised the windows either side were big enough for corridors for people to walk through.

Having said that, there are signs to platforms 100 – 117.  If platforms at Grand Central are consecutively numbered, that makes it a significantly larger station than any I have travelled though.

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Apple has recently opened an Apple Store on one of the balconies, turning what was a public space into a shop.

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Off to one side is the Vanderbilt Hall with magnificent chandeliers and decorative stonemasonry work.

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

Grand Central Terminal My journey into and out of New York City were both from NYP, New York Pennsylvania Station. 
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At Poughkeepsie station I felt strangely at home at the old Reading station when I realised the platform (American English: track) numbering system.  Platform 2 is on the other side of platform 1…

The journey was rather uneventful along the Hudson river.

It ended at Penn Station.  Although built as part of the Pennsylvania train service in the early 20th century it was demolished and rebuilt in the 1960’s into a very modern looking station underneath Madison Square Gardens.

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

Poughkeepsie to Penn At Poughkeepsie station I felt strangely at home at the old Reading station when I realised the platform (American English: track) numbering system. 
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There are many towns called Kingston, two in England alone and there is one in New York State as well, the county seat of Ulster County.  European settlers arrived around 1652 and started to farm where the Esopus Indians had been growing maize for generations.  Peter Stuyvesant was asked to mediate after vandalism on both sides broke out.  He designated a stockade at the top of a hill to be settled by the Europeans and this remains the centre of the town.

Most of the big old houses have become offices for lawyers representing clients at the Ulster County Court.  This court house saw the first trial won by a black parent, Sojourner Truth.  Despite her illiteracy she successfully argued her son’s case.

Painted peacocks were on display, showcasing local artists with the intent of raising money to re-build a playground in a local park.  There are 25 overall, but I didn’t know that until after my visit didn’t look for them all.

There are also many murals in the town only one of which being an advertisement.

One other remarkable collection is this set of plaques, similar in style to those denoting historic figures or places, in this case however criticising current society.

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

Peacocks in Kingston There are many towns called Kingston, two in England alone and there is one in New York State as well, the county seat of Ulster County. 
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A group of  French Protestants sought safety from Catholic persecution in the 1600s, first by fleeing to die Pfalz in south-western Germany, and then to America. In 1678 they established a community on the banks of the Wallkill River in the Hudson Valley.  The ‘f’ from the Pfalz got lost, a ‘t’ was added and New Paltz was founded.

Huguenot Street has the longest continuous habitation of any street in the US and is a designated National Historic Landmark District. A number of the original houses belong to Historic Huguenot Street making up an innovative museum of the church and some houses on display to the public interspersed with those still serving as residences.

New Paltz is on a steep hill, fortunately there are plenty of resting places at the top to catch your breath.

At the bottom of the hill, Water Street Market is an outlet for work by many local artisans.

To make crossing the road by Water Street Market safer, the community has implemented a system of Ped Flags as explained below.

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There is a community garden, protected by a tyre-sea monster and home to many sunflowers, some of which my host and I sought to imitate.

Behind the community garden is a nature preserve where we spotted some turtles sunning themselves on a log.

New Paltz made the news in 2004 when, before same sex marriage was legal, the Mayor performed 25 marriage ceremonies in the Peace Park.  All were later declared not legally valid, however it started the movement towards marriage equality in the US.

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

Not so New Paltz A group of  French Protestants sought safety from Catholic persecution in the 1600s, first by fleeing to 
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Views up and down the Hudson River from the Walkway over the Hudson in New York, USA

(Source: travel-tales.org)

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The Hudson Walkway between Poughkeepsie and Highland in New York State

(Source: travel-tales.org)

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Split Rock pool in the Shawangunks, NY

(Source: travel-tales.org)

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In 1886 construction began for the railway bridge spanning the Hudson between Poughkeepsie and Highland.  The first train crossed December 29, 1888. When the bridge opened in 1889, it was the longest bridge in North America and the first bridge to span the Hudson River between Albany and New York City. It was a key link between western raw materials to eastern industrial centres until a fire in 1974 closed it.

Since then it fell into disrepair until in 1992 the Walkway over the Hudson project started to turn it into a publically accessible walk way.  It was opened as such in October 2009 and I think it is now the longest pedestrian bridge in the world.

At the Highland End there remains a reminder of its original freight rail purpose

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I struggled to see the other end of the 1.28 mile bridge from either end.

An American flag flies at the centre of the bridge from which you get a great view of the Mid-Hudson Bridge to the south and the river with and without traffic to the north.

While on the bridge you don’t really see its construction, luckily from Poughkeepsie Station which is between the two bridges you get quite a good view of both of them from underneath and professional pictures are displayed along the walkway.

For daily pictures from this blog you can follow me on tumblr. at www.traveltash.tumblr.com and on Twitter @tash_higman.   You can follow the current journey ‘live’ by liking the Travel-Tales page on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/traveltalesorg where I also post additional small titbits that don’t fit into the twice-weekly blog posts.

 

Walking on sunshine In 1886 construction began for the railway bridge spanning the Hudson between Poughkeepsie and Highland.  The first train crossed December 29, 1888.